We're making waves with

CORAL

CORAL is the premier robotic ocean-rehabilitation product on the market.
CORAL is an acronym that stands for Collecting Organisms, Rubbish, And
Logistics, which is exactly what it is designed to do. Our goal is to find a
way to perform the designated tasks in the game in the most efficient way
possible. To see more details on these tasks, please visit Game Theme.
We wanted our robot to have distinctive efficiency, which we define as
making a maximum profit with a minimum amount of time wasted. CORAL
is capable of completing the following tasks more efficiently than any other
product on the market.


1) Removing the ducks from the current

2) Collecting the turtle from a gyre and transporting it back against the
current

3) Collecting garbage:
a) Microplastics
b) Bottles (8 oz, 16oz, 1 liter)

4) Depositing the microplastics and garbage into the reef blocks and
filament tubes

5) Moving these reef blocks and filament tubes higher for improved
scoring


The reason that CORAL is able to complete these tasks more efficiently
than the robots of our competitors is because of its structure and design.
CORAL has a rectangular base which enhances the flexibility of our
components and self-adjusts to balance the weight of our machine as it
moves through the current. On the base, the robot has an arm with a joint
that will maximize the compliance space and easily extend into the ocean
gyres to collect wildlife and garbage. The hand is a specially designed
piece that interlocks for increased dexterity, or skill, with handling the game
pieces in the simulator. To move along the simulated current, CORAL is
equipped with guide wheels and driving wheels that work together to
ensure a smooth ride so that cargo will not be bumped out and the robot
will not be slowed by friction. Below the current, there is a second base
attached to our robot that ensures stability. Both bases, the wheels, the arm, and the hand all work together to guarantee CORAL a spot at the top.
It is the most efficient robot to be found for ocean gyre rehabilitation.

Working on CORAL
InstagramFacebookTwitterYoutube Webmaster: Madelyn Hunter // Upload Date: September 6, 2018 // Brooks High School